Anshu Arora LLM, MSc, PMP

Cell 604-828-7331 | info@anshuarora.com

The purpose of designation is to protect a heritage building from unsympathetic alteration, and subsequent loss of character or value. A designated landscape can also be protected from unsympathetic construction or excavation.

However, some alterations may be required for the ongoing use of a designated building, interior, or landscape.

 

Buildings, interiors, or landscapes that merit designation are recommended to City Council by the Director of Planning, with the advice of the Heritage Commission.

As part of the designation process:

  • The property owner is sent a notification letter
  • Council places notifications in local newspapers
  • A public hearing is convened

The property owner is compensated by the City for any possible loss in property value, perceived or real. The property owner is also compensated for rehabilitation and ongoing obligations of the designation. Compensation can be in money or - most often - through bylaw relaxations.

 

A majority vote of Council is required to pass a bylaw designating a building, any portion of its interior, or a landscape. The designation is then noted on the property title. Once a site is designated, the City enacts a new bylaw specifically for that site.

 

Fore more information, visit City of Vancouver Website

 

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There are many ways to find a strata management company with a reputation for providing helpful, reliable strata management services. Members of the strata council can ask friends and coworkers who own strata lots in other strata corporations for recommendations. Additionally, many strata management companies providing strata management services identify their services, and other information about themselves, through websites found on the internet.

 

The strata council may wish to discuss with each potential strata management company the range of services, knowledge and other matters, such as the following, before choosing to contract with a strata management company:

  • years of direct industry experience of the strata management company and the proposed strata manager;
  • any professional memberships or additional certifications;
  • number of strata corporations being managed by the strata management company, each strata manager engaged by the company, and, specifically, by the proposed strata manager;
  • administrative staff available to support the proposed strata manager;
  • whether contractors/service providers engaged by the strata corporation will be replaced by those typically used by the strata management company/strata manager, if different;
  • format/style of financial reports, minutes and other documents being prepared by the strata management company on behalf of the strata corporation;
  • references from other strata corporations being managed by the strata management company/proposed strata manager; and
  • whether any disciplinary actions have been taken by the Council against either the strata management company or the proposed strata manager.

For more information, visit the RECBC website

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  • You can cancel the listing at any time, if you think you're realtor tricked you into signing the contract, if he mislead you or fraudulently represented himself.
  • Realtors are governed by the real estate act of BC and have to follow the Realtor code of ethics. If you think you're realtor is involved in unscrupulous activities, you can contact your local real estate board, the BC real estate association and the Real estate council of BC
  • There is no such thing as standard commission. It's Always Negotiable and depends on a case by case basis; it depends on the market, the location of the property, the condition of the property and the agent.
  • The cheapest realtor is never the best realtor. As the old adage goes - you get what you pay for. If you want a realtor who will push your house/property, who will advertise and send out flyers, who will negotiate skillfully - well then guess what - you'll have to pay for this high quality of service. Like it or not, realtors are businessmen; and even though they like helping people, at the end of the day, they still have to make money.
  • A lot of realtors sell real estate part time. If you want quality service, make sure your realtor is a full time realtor and not a part time one. This will ensure that he or she is available for potential buyers and their questions, at all times.

 

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Although it is possible to sell your own home and save on real estate commissions, there can be obstacles associated with this personal undertaking.


 

  • Pricing/savings. Can the initial attraction of saving on commission mean underselling your home? Absolutely. I’ve seen it happen where the FSBO seller decides to price their home and negotiate an offer that is less than the amount they could have received by using a Realtor, and that’s after commission. Equipped with the Multiple Listing Service, a Realtor is able to accurately evaluate the fair market price and negotiate close to it.
  • Hidden expenses. Unexpected costs may arise after the buyer’s home inspection. There may be deficiencies that need to be addressed immediately. These could be very expensive fixes that the FSBO seller may believe is their entire responsibility in order to complete the sale. Additional “out of pocket” expenses include marketing and higher legal fees. Although the FSBO seller is not paying any commission to a realtor to sell their property, if a realtor brings a buyer, that realtor will expect to be paid the buyer’s agent’s commission, or negotiate a flat fee arrangement.
  • Screening and prequalifying potential purchasers. The inability to accurately determine whether a buyer can afford to purchase your home can cause the FSBO seller huge headaches. When a Realtor is involved with a sale, they are required to prequalify their buyers ensuring that they are viewing a home they can ultimately purchase.
  • Bringing strangers into your home. This can be a major safety concern. When you are selling your home and using FSBO websites, you are extending an invitation not only to potential buyers but also to people that may have no intention of buying.
  • Exposure. FSBO websites are available when selling your own home however most purchasers are unaware that these sites exist and when made aware can be fearful of them. The majority of buyers search MLS-based websites like Realtor.ca or REW.ca.
  • Legal liability. Selling your home can be very complicated. Realtors are insured in the event that a lawsuit arises due to buyer’s dissatisfaction usually caused by misrepresentation and/or non-disclosure. If such issues come up, the FSBO seller would be personally liable. Fact: Even Realtors are not advised to sell their own properties as they are not protected by their insurance.

 

 

 

Although it is possible to sell your own home and save on real estate commissions, there can be obstacles associated with this personal undertaking.

  • Pricing/savings. Can the initial attraction of saving on commission mean underselling your home? Absolutely. I’ve seen it happen where the FSBO seller decides to price their home and negotiate an offer that is less than the amount they could have received by using a Realtor, and that’s after commission. Equipped with the Multiple Listing Service, a Realtor is able to accurately evaluate the fair market price and negotiate close to it.
  • Hidden expenses. Unexpected costs may arise after the buyer’s home inspection. There may be deficiencies that need to be addressed immediately. These could be very expensive fixes that the FSBO seller may believe is their entire responsibility in order to complete the sale. Additional “out of pocket” expenses include marketing and higher legal fees. Although the FSBO seller is not paying any commission to a realtor to sell their property, if a realtor brings a buyer, that realtor will expect to be paid the buyer’s agent’s commission, or negotiate a flat fee arrangement.
  • Screening and prequalifying potential purchasers. The inability to accurately determine whether a buyer can afford to purchase your home can cause the FSBO seller huge headaches. When a Realtor is involved with a sale, they are required to prequalify their buyers ensuring that they are viewing a home they can ultimately purchase.
  • Bringing strangers into your home. This can be a major safety concern. When you are selling your home and using FSBO websites, you are extending an invitation not only to potential buyers but also to people that may have no intention of buying.
  • Exposure. FSBO websites are available when selling your own home however most purchasers are unaware that these sites exist and when made aware can be fearful of them. The majority of buyers search MLS-based websites like Realtor.ca or REW.ca.
  • Legal liability. Selling your home can be very complicated. Realtors are insured in the event that a lawsuit arises due to buyer’s dissatisfaction usually caused by misrepresentation and/or non-disclosure. If such issues come up, the FSBO seller would be personally liable. Fact: Even Realtors are not advised to sell their own properties as they are not protected by their insurance.
- See more at: http://www.rew.ca/news/sellers-series-pitfalls-of-the-for-sale-by-owner-route-1.1943017#sthash.eJutr7FK.dpuf
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Costs for even relatively moderate kitchen redos can run well into the tens of thousands of dollars. Here are a few ways to enhance this focal point of a home on a budget.


  1. Go with affordable cabinets, possibly a line with simple maple, cherry, or oak rather than exotic imported wood or lacquered fronts. Also, opt for pressed rather than solid wood interiors and shelves to pare costs. Because cabinets often represent 50 percent to 60 percent of a remodeled kitchen’s cost, saving here brings down the price.
  2. Appliances are another huge cost factor in redoing a kitchen, and stainless-steel name brands are among the biggest offenders. Besides opting for less expensive black-and-white fronts and going with cheaper brands, Web sites like Craigslist and Overstock are good resources for new or little-used items others are trying to get rid of.
  3. Changing a countertop or several can add an instant fresh look, but instead of replacing them with high-end granite, marble, or manmade quartzes, Manfredini suggests covering tired laminate tops with RustOleum’s highly durable Countertop Transformation product, a three-part system that transforms them into look-alike granites in five different colors.
  4. Though replacing an entire floor can be costly, time-consuming, and expensive, there are handsome options that will last and won’t break the bank. Durable and affordable options include Marmoleum, a sustainable linoleum, which no longer resembles what your parents or grandparents had but comes in hot colors and textures; old-growth bamboo that’s denser than new variations; and cork, another natural material that’s easily repairable if dings (or worse) occur.
  5. A new backsplash can make a huge difference, and there are many self-adhesive tiles that are easy to install for DIY consumers, including those with the hot metal look in vintage or modern patterns and a host of sizes, shapes, and colors, Manfredini says. Savvy home owners also should consider contacting manufacturers, many of which offer overstocked goods for far less.
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