Anshu Arora LLM, MSc, PMP

Cell 604-828-7331 | info@anshuarora.com

Nearly 80 percent of homebuyers have at least one major regret about their new home. Here are a few tips to avoid being one of them.


1. Keep your focus
When you began house hunting, you likely drafted a "wants/needs" list, prioritizing the "must-have" features and noting the "would like to have" features. Don't let "want" features distract you from your main objectives. Your agent can help you stick to your list.

2. Triple check your math
Unexpected costs can trigger buyer's remorse. When you calculate how much home you can afford, make sure your agent or financial pro reviews the costs for things like yard care and homeowner's insurance. A home inspection will give you an idea of what type of repairs you can expect so you can budget for those as well.

3. Resist the drama
Don't get sucked into a bidding war and lose perspective. Your agent can help you stay objective and remind you that you're trying to buy the right home, not win an auction. You don't want your competitive streak to leave you saddled with a home that isn't quite what you were looking for.


Your home is one of the biggest investments you'll make in your life so, of course, house hunting can be an emotional rollercoaster. Working with an experienced agent like ME, can help you cope with the twists and turns.

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1. Don't mess with your income-to-debt ratio
The ratio of your monthly income to your monthly debts is one of the main factors the lender considered when qualifying you. And your lender will probably run your financials two or three more times before closing. While it's tempting, don't take out a big loan for the new deck you want to install when you move into your new place. Don't sign the lease on the new Audi that will look perfect in your new driveway. The bank looks at lease payments like any other debt payment.


2. Don't disappear
Be sure to keep in touch with your lender and be readily available to immediately address any last-minute concerns.


3. Don't change jobs
Lenders love stability. Switching jobs right before closing can make them anxious, and you want to give them every reason to feel confident. Most lenders prefer to have a two-year job history in hand, so making a big career move could slow things down, or squash the deal entirely.


4. Don't open new credit cards
Yes, you'll be buying furniture to fill those lovely rooms. Yes, you might need a new fridge. And yes, new dishes to match the new kitchen would be splendid. But resist the lure of opening new credit cards until after closing. Doing so can affect your credit score. For now, just open catalogs.


5. Don't be late
Even though you may have been riding the real estate roller coaster and life's been chaotic, be sure to stay current with all bill payments. Late payments, too, can affect that all-important credit score.

 

Wondering what else is involved in the final stretches of a home purchase? I will be happy to answer any of your questions.

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If you’re trying to sell your home, you’ve probably scrutinized it, staged it, and scrubbed it down from floorboards to rooftop as if the folks from Architectural Digest were stopping by for a cover shoot. OK, so it’s in immaculate shape—but your home isn’t the only thing under scrutiny here. You are, too! That’s right: No matter how nice your home is, your behavior can also affect how buyers feel about making an offer. Here are the unwritten etiquette rules sellers should follow to show their home—and themselves—in the best possible light.

Leave

Sure, you’re dying to know if prospective buyers will love what you’ve done with the kitchen, but Realtors® agree sellers should not be there lurking in the shadows during an open house or showing.

Take your pets with you

You think Humbert is the cutest labradoodle ever, but not everyone is bound to share that opinion. In addition to having allergies, some home shoppers may not be in the market for a run-in with an animal they don’t know.

“Imagine, as a buyer, having the background music set to ‘barking dog’ while you are trying to take in the home’s nuances that you, as the seller, have worked so hard to hone,”

Move your car

“Make it easy for visitors to park and view the home.” “No one likes parking issues. Having them is a sure way to get a viewing off to a bad start.” In fact, if potential buyers have to park a block away and walk, they may just skip taking the tour of your home. Or if they’re willing to make the hike, they may be in a lousy mood by the time they enter your home. Why risk it?

Lay out important documents

If questions arise while buyers are on the premises, it may help them decide to put in an offer that much faster if they can find answers quickly and in writing.

“Leaving necessary documents in an easy-to-find spot isn’t just good for selling, it’s also good selling etiquette,” says Kensington. “Put out the home inspection report, appraisal, home warranty, monthly bill information—gas, oil, electric—and proof of any major repairs are all good things to let people look through when they are considering buying your home.”

Offer some refreshments

House hunters can get parched and peckish. You can help!

“Putting out a few small bottled waters in a small bowl of ice is always appreciated, along with some light, easy grab-and-go sort of refreshments like mints or cookies,”

Be patient waiting for feedback

Of course, you’re dying to know what buyers thought of your home, but that information may not flow back to you instantaneously. Buyers often want to process what they’ve seen and think it over before making an offer. If one comes through, don’t worry, you’ll hear about it!

“It is reasonable to ask for feedback from your Realtor after the showing, but understand it may take a day or two for the buyer’s agent to respond,” Hayward says.

Don’t be greedy

Who doesn’t want top dollar for their home? But an unwillingness to negotiate can kill a possible deal and keep your home on the market long after you were hoping to be unpacking at your new place.

“Focusing on your bottom line is always important, but greed can lead to disaster. Remember a little of something is better than a lot of nothing. Generosity will lead you to your promise land,” 

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According to the National Association of Realtors, 42 percent of homebuyers start their home search online, and 92 percent use the Web during the home search process. While the Internet can be a good place to start looking, there are things real estate agents know about the process of buying and selling a home that can't be found in any Web browser.

 

Here are a few.

1. How to price a home

When setting a listing price, agents consider scores of factors, from local and national market trends and neighborhood development activity to the latest buyer preferences for kitchen appliances and landscaping. Every home is unique, and an agent with a track record of success knows how to price it attractively in the market.

The Internet isn't always much help when it comes to comparison shopping, either. Many of the same factors that help an agent set an appropriate listing price aren't available in an algorithm, so online estimators aren't always accurate – and could be costly if you purchase without consulting a real, live professional.

2. Marketing offline

While online marketing can certainly be valuable, agents have networks of contacts and years of experience to round out their marketing plans.

And, for buyers, agents often can tap into their network to learn about great properties before they hit the real estate websites or even the MLS.

3. Key points in the process

If you find a home you love online, the website won't be there to guide you through a mortgage application, find a home inspector or advise you what to do if an inspection reveals issues.

4. How to negotiate

Having an experienced, professional negotiator drive your transaction can be vital to reaching a fair price for the property you're buying or selling. A website can give you an estimate of how much a property should cost, but it can't evaluate whether that's a great price or not.

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1.) Summer is Over, Why Bother with Curb Appeal?

In a few weeks, summer will come to a screeching halt, but that doesn’t mean the extra attention the exterior of your home has been receiving has to come to an end as well. Make sure your fall curb appeal is exactly where it needs to be by ensuring walkways and gutters are free of leaves and debris, and ensure your lawn is always mowed. With unexpected weather the fall months can bring, keeping your trees neatly trimmed will ensure fallen branches don’t make your yard appear messy and unkempt.

 

2.) People Spend More Time Indoors, So Focus Your Attention There

Just because fall doesn’t have the heat of the summer, doesn’t mean people stay indoors. With the beauty the changing leaves and crisp fall air has to offer, some people actually enjoy spending time outdoors in the fall more than they do in the summer. Celebrate the season with seasonal home décor around the holidays that will attract potential buyers by making your house feel more like a home.

 

3.) The Weather is Cold, and So is Your Home

When summer inevitably comes to an end, the first sign will be the plummeting temperatures outdoors. Just because it’s cooler outdoors doesn’t mean your home décor needs to reflect that! Consider a fresh coat of paint in a warmer shade, and don’t be afraid to bring the temperature up a couple degrees to make your guests feel comfortable. If you don’t want to make a large change, a few additions like cozy pillows or throws can go a long way in cozying up your home décor for the cooler months.

 

4.) The Price Doesn’t Have to be Quite Right

The biggest mistake you can make when selling in the fall is pricing it incorrectly. The first thing you should do is understand the importance of working with a real estate professional, and from there, how to choose the right one for you. Working with a professional will help you ensure your home is priced correctly for the fall market.

 

5.) Once It Sells, You’re Done!

The paper’s are signed, and the deal is done, so all you have to do is pack up and move, right? Not quite! Leading up to the holidays, everyone is very busy which means you may have issues finding time to pack, finding a company to help you move, or even finding family and friends who would normally be able to lend a helping hand. To eliminate these issues, plan ahead! Make sure your moving date is scheduled firm in everyone’s calendar, and plan ahead to ensure you aren’t left without a solution if someone is forced to back out. A stress free move will make the world of a difference in the first couple days in your new home.

 

Now that you know the common myths about the fall real estate market, you may have a bit more to think about this summer! Take this time to enjoy everything summer has to offer, but tackle small projects on this list to ensure there are no surprises when fall roles around and the iconic red, white, and blue for sale sign is standing proudly on

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